ROI of UX: Mozilla Support Site Redesign

Nielsen Norman Group recently shared a great case study showing return on investment of utilizing user-centered design and usability testing for a website redesign. Take-aways are:

  • Mozilla support website redesign took 560 hours (or 14 weeks)
  • Multiple UX research methods uncovered pain points and areas for improvement
  • Designs were tested as prototypes and improved based on user feedback; 7 versions were assessed during project lifecycle
  • As a result, there was a 70% decrease in support questions submitted, and
  • 80-90% of submitted questions were answered within 24 hrs, an increase from 40-60% rate before re-design

 

Why Software Dev Projects Fail: a Classic Reference

About 25% of software development projects fail before launch (source). For many businesses such failures can be the straw that broke the camel’s back. In his 2005 article Why Software Fails, Robert Charette discusses common factors that contribute to such poor outcomes. While some responsibility can be laid on the doorsteps of stakeholders and managers, lack of team-wide focus on user needs and user-focused requirements are also among the culprits. Although it’s been 10 years since the article was published, little has changed in how software development projects are executed. Hence, use this reference to help evangelize user-centered design and user experience practices internally and externally!

ROI of UX: Discussion Forum Redesign

I do not need to convince my colleagues of the value of user research, usability testing and overall focus on meeting user needs during product development cycle. They get it: satisfied users are good for business! Yet, stakeholders regularly demand case studies and hard numbers before opening purse strings to fund a project. As a result, I am collecting (and sharing) UX success stories to help evangelize on value of UX and to make future “battles” for funding shorter, less intense, and (fingers crossed!) extinct!


Redesign of BreastCancer.org website based on user testing lead to the following return on investment:

  • 117% increase in unique website visitors
  • 41% increase in new user registrations
  • 53% reduction in duration of registration process
  • 206% increase in number of daily posts
  • 80% decrease in number of Help Desk support cases
  • 69% decrease in Help Desk cost

These are pretty nice numbers! You can read the full report here.

 

Heuristic Evaluation Checklist for Smartphones and Tablets

A heuristic evaluation checklist developed specifically for assessing usability of mobile devices has recently been published by a team from Spain. The authors combined standard software heuristic checklists from leading authorities in the field, and adapted them for evaluating touchscreen devices. The checklist was tested with non-trained engineers who were able to effectively identify usability gaps of a design. The authors argue that “selecting and rearranging these heuristic guidelines offer a tool which works well not just for evaluation but also as a best-practices checklist.” See their Supplementary Materials for the entire checklist.

ROI of Mobile UX

This article presents a case study comparing user behavior on an e-commerce website before and after it was optimized for mobile devices. Improving user experience by optimizing the website for mobile devices lead to, among other things:

  • System Usability Scale (SUS) increased from 57 to 73
  • Website bounce rate decreased by 50%
  • Unique page views increased by 41%
  • Particular product sales increased by 31%
  • Overall sales increased by over 70%

Debunking Myths about Data-driven Design

This article from UX Magazine addresses the following myths about data-driven design:

  1. Data = numbers
  2. Data is the truth
  3. Bigger is better
  4. Designers do not need data
  5. Data and innovation don’t mix
  6. There is a right (and a wrong) way to use data in design

The author Pamela Pavliscak argues that quantitative data from A/B studies or analytics are not always sufficient to inform design for a great user experience; she proposes that utilizing insights from qualitative data is as important (if not more!) as relying on quantitative measures.